Deleting Files From Snapper

16. February, 2014

Snapper is a nice tool to revert changes made to your system.

Unfortunately, it has a nasty side effect: If you happen to delete some large files (say, an ISO image you accidentally copied to the wrong place), and that large file ended up in one of your snapshots, well … the file will be gone but the disk space will still be allocated.

The first step is to locate the large file(s) underĀ /.snapshots

The next step is to delete it/them. That’s not so easy since snapper created read-only file system snapshots. The workaround is to create a writable snapshot, delete the files, delete the read-only snapshot, create a new one and then delete the writable snapshot. Too much on one sentence? Here is the sequence of commands:

cd .../
btrfs subvolume snapshot snapshot snapshot.bak
rm -rf snapshot.bak/...
btrfs subvolume delete snapshot
btrfs subvolume snapshot -r snapshot.bak snapshot
btrfs subvolume delete snapshot.bak

Breakdown: First, we cd into the folder which contains the snapshot itself (it also contains a file “info.xml”).

Then we clone the snapshot in “snapshot.bak” which we can modify.

The last three steps replace “snapshot” with the new, cleaned “snapshot.bak”.

In at least one occasion, that didn’t free the disk space, yet. I also had to delete the oldest snapshot which contained the file.


How We See Things

1. February, 2014

We don’t see things how they are, but how we are.

As Sheldon from Big Bang Theory said: “Text adventures run on the world’s most powerful graphics chip: Imagination!

Everything you see or hear happens in your brain.

Think about it.

That insult that really hurt? Only in your brain.

Interesting, isn’t it?

Just beware of the “everything is my fault” concept. There is no point in trying to take responsibility for everything.