When Uncle Doc Gets Hacked

6. August, 2016

Most of the time, when users get infected with a computer virus or a Trojan, it’s a nuisance. But what happens when an important person becomes a victim of a cracker like your doctor?

How about this story:

I got a mail from a good friend. It had no text, just a link. I clicked the link and a web site of a big pharmaceutical company. It was a bit odd but I thought nothing of it. I’m a doctor, so I visit a lot of medical websites.

A couple of days after that, I got mails from old friends that thanked me for getting in touch with them again after such a long time. I was puzzled.

Yesterday, I got an email from myself. That I never wrote. It seems when I clicked the link above in my web mail, “something” happened.

Apparently, everyone in my address book got spammed.

The attackers got the address book. Which is inside the mail software. Which means they had access to the mail software. Which means they had access to all the mails. Do you exchange mails with your doctor? How much do you like the idea that “someone” out there had access to those mails?

We need to fix computer security.


Is Climate Change Just A Lot Of Hot Air?

26. June, 2015

A thought-provoking video by MinuteEarth:


The Quest to End Poverty

25. June, 2015

Poverty is a huge problem, even for those not affected. At best, the sight is disturbing, at worst, the sicknesses bred by many people crammed together don’t care much for bank accounts – even when it might help that you can pay doctor’s bills and meds.

In 2011, over $150 billion were spent on development aid. That sum sounds staggering if you look at the number alone. Keep in mind that the world’s GDP in 2011 was 75’621 billion (use the table view to see per country numbers) – aid is 0.2% of that. The US military budget alone was $610 billion. World-wide aid was just a quarter of what the US spends on its military.

What’s more, a lot of that money never leaves the donor country – it’s used to “pay” for debt which the receiving country already has towards the donor – or it’s vouchers for goods which the donor produces (like guns and other military equipment). As odd as that may sound at first: Development aid is often another tool to develop your own country. If it helps a struggling third world place, all the better.

But the problem runs deeper. Too deep to explain in a blog post but TED compiled a list of 11 through provoking talks how we could end poverty. My favorite didn’t make it into the list: Gary Haugen: The hidden reason for poverty the world needs to address now.

Think!


Trouble Sleeping?

21. May, 2015

There are people who are proud that they don’t need much sleep.

Don’t listen to them. People who don’t sleep enough make more mistakes, they are dumber than they could be, they ruin their health, their sex life, to name just a few of the most important downsides.

Yes, it’s easy to reduce the amount of time you’re sleeping every day and the negative effects aren’t obvious. People sleep just a few hours every night feel powerful and agitated – mostly because of the adrenaline levels you get from the stress of lack of sleep. But adrenaline also makes reckless and unreliable. It bends you towards risky behavior which causes accidents and disasters like the world financial crisis.

If you’re one of these people, stop it. The additional hours don’t really make you more productive, no matter how much you would like to make yourself believe. Your ruler is broken – a sleep-deprived brain isn’t able to notice just how tired it really is. And even at the best of times, it costs your company almost $2’000 every year for every employee.

Richard Wiseman has put together a short list of tips to help you sleep. Plus he has created the World’s Most Relaxing Music. One hour of sound that has been scientifically engineered to relax you.

Related:


Handicapped

3. May, 2014

Disabled people aren’t handicapped, they are getting obstructed.


Unhappy?

17. January, 2014

This might help:

The Holstee ManifestoCopyright information

The Holstee Manifesto
Copyright information


Smart Phones Vs Recreation

30. April, 2013

In some companies, a culture of “always on” has crept in. People are getting emails and phone calls in their spare time.

As a solution, add this to your contract: For every minute you spend on work related tasks in your spare time, you can log twice the time in your tracker. Tracking happens in 15 minute increments.

So if someone really needs to call your during the weekend to ask just a quick question, you can leave half an hour early on Monday. And if that question turns into a 4 hour monster, you have a whole day off (or eight hours overtime).

That way, there is a “price tag” on your spare time. People don’t have to feel that guilty for calling you but they are also aware of the cost when they do.