Haul 1.22 Tour de Ship

20. June, 2010

I’ve just uploaded scene 1.22 plus improved the last scene a bit. Please post a comment if you like the story (and especially you don’t like it!)

1.22 Tour de Ship – While Rarrarar tries to sell the idea of giving the Rabits a tour of the ship, the Rabit make their plans.

1.21 Game, Anyone? – The first Rabit dragged away is Forne Rako.

If you’ve already read the last scene, here is the change:

‘Get a grip, Forne!’ he told himself. ‘This might be our only chance to get a look beyond these doors! And you’re already dead, remember?’ He shot a quick glance at Vance, who nodded encouragingly. To know a friend was close helped Forne a lot.

* * *

She activated a subroutine of her implant to maintain her clear head because all this was starting to wear her nerves thin. To be able to meditate about this aspect later on, she added a comment to the log about her thoughts. That helped her to focus in the current situation. While she did that, the second half of her consciousness kept an eye on the forum which was tracking their progress. Almost 100 Haul were watching them over the net, posting comments and discussing observations.

Several Haul from Warr‘s department were already busy to compress the text into cross-referenced reports. She was glad for the help, this part of the work always took her ages. With the new support, she could concentrate on reading and adding her own scent to everything that occurred to her.

Table of contents

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Ich habe gerade Szene 1.22 hochgeladen und die letzte Szene verbessert. Bitte poste einen Kommentar, wenn dir die Geschichte gefällt (und vor allem, wenn sie dir nicht gefällt!)

1.22 Schiffsführung – Während Rarrarar dem Kapitän die Idee einer Schiffsführung schmackhaft macht, schmieden die Rabit Pläne.

1.21 Will jemand spielen? – Als die Haul kommen, um den ersten Rabit zu holen, trifft es Forne Rako.

Wenn du die letzte Szene schon gelesen hast, dann ist hier die Änderung:

‘Reiss dich zusammen, Forne!’ sagte er sich. ‘Das könnte unsere beste Chance sein einen Blick auf die andere Seite zu werfen! Und vergiss nicht: Du bist bereits tot, schon vergessen?’ Er warf Vance einen raschen Blick zu und dieser nickte ermutigend. Zu wissen, dass ein Freund in der Nähe war, half Forne sehr.

* * *

Um sich zu entlasten, startete sie eine Zusatzfunktion ihres Implantats, die ihr helfen würde einen klaren Kopf zu bewahren. Zusätzlich speicherte sie ihre Gedanken in einem Kommentar ab, damit sie später darüber meditieren konnte. Dies half ihr sich auf die Gegenwart zu konzentrieren. Währenddessen behielt sie mit der zweiten Hälfte ihres Bewusstseins das Forum im Auge, in dem ihre Situation diskutiert wurde. Knapp 100 Haul beobachteten sie über das Netz, schrieben kommentare und diskutierten Beobachtungen.

Mehrere Haul aus Warr‘s Abteilung waren bereits damit beschäftigt die Informationen in Berichte mit Kreuzreferenzen zu verdichten. Sie war froh über die Hilfe; dieser Teil ihrer Arbeit nahm immer viel Zeit in Anspruch. Mit der neuen Unterstützung konnte sie sich auf das Lesen konzentrieren und ihren Geruch nur noch dann hinzufügen, wenn ihr etwas auffiel.

Inhaltsverzeichnis


Ubunutu is safer than Windows

17. June, 2010

At least according to Dell.

See point 6 (“Ubuntu is safer than Microsoft® Windows®”). Let’s see how long the page will be available.

Update 21st of June 2010: The page is still there but it now just reads “Ubuntu is secure” and instead of “The vast majority of viruses and spyware written by hackers are not designed to target and attack Linux”, it just says “According to industry reports, Ubuntu is unaffected by the vast majority of viruses and spyware” 😉


Haul 1.21 Game Anyone?

14. June, 2010

Scene 1.21 is now ready for you. It’s a long one, so I hope that makes up for the long wait. Don’t forget to post a comment if you like the story (and you must post a comment if you don’t like it!)

1.21 Game, Anyone? – The first Rabit dragged away is Forne Rako.

Table of contents

Previous post


Szene 1.21 ist nun bereit für euch. Sie ist ziemlich lang, was für die Wartezeit entschädigen sollte. Vergiss nicht einen Kommentar zu posten, wenn dir die Geschichte gefällt (und wenn sie dir nicht gefällt, dann musst du einen Kommentar posten!)

1.21 Will jemand spielen? – Als die Haul kommen, um den ersten Rabit zu holen, trifft es Forne Rako.

Inhaltsverzeichnis


Jazoon 2010, day 3

7. June, 2010

The last post of the series (day 1, day 2).

The Gaia satellite and Data Processing by William O’Mullane

The day started with some astronomy. Gaia is another effort for a complete sky survey (like it’s predecessor Hiparcos). It’s a “cheap” mission by ESA which costs “only” 600 Million Euros (most space missions start at 1 Billion). It’s interesting how they keep pushing the limits today. Gaia will orbit L2, 1.5 million km away from Earth (the Moon is only 300’000km away). If something goes wrong, there is no way to fix it (which is why most systems are redundant except for the main mirror, for example). The main camera has 170 CCD chips. A huge effort is taken to determine the exact position of the satellite, it’s rotation speed, precise orientation, the position of the components (like the main camera in relation to the main mirror).

It will generate such an enormous amount of data that most of it will have to be thrown away on the craft before it is downloaded. The data will be available to anyone … anyone who can store a couple of petabytes at least (1 petabyte = 1000 terrabytes).

The mind boggles 🙂

Essentials of Testing: The Tools You Need to Know by Bettina Polasek and Marco Cicolini

My topic 🙂 The talk showed how they selected a couple of tools from all the available ones out there by functionality, how they support and complete each other and how well they are supported. Here is the list they came up with:

  • jDepend to know who uses what
  • GlassFish as a means to run J2EE tests out- and inside a container
  • HtmlUnit for testing web pages outside the browser (faster than Selenium but doesn’t catch all kinds of errors)
  • Selenium for testing web pages inside the browser. Slower than HtmlUnit but can test browser specific quirks.
  • PMD to keep your code clean.
  • FEST stands for “Fixtures for Easy Software Testing” and is a library to make testing more simple. For example, you’ll find code here to test Swing UIs or mock the classes you need outside the scope of your test.
  • Mockito, a mocking framework. It takes mocking to the next level with fluent interfaces.

Rapid Application Development with Apache Wicket by Andrew Lombardi

Again a tough one. I’d have loved to attend Using Software Metrics to detect refactorings by Thomas Haug.

Wicket is another web framework for Java. “Why another one?” I hear you wail. Because they all suck? Being an Apache project, Wicket tries to suck less. It’s fully mavenized and builds upon a component framework (the simple ones are built in and you find extensions on wicketstuff.org).

Wicket revolves around the idea that you give it a plain HTML (with almost no extensions) and a piece of Java which connects parts of the HTML with the code so you can simply render your pages from these components.

I’m not 100% sold, yet. Wicket was started around 2005 and has been under the radar most of the time. This can mean that it doesn’t solve all the problems. We’ll see.

Lunch break.

Building DSLs with Eclipse by Peter Friese

I’m a huge fan of code generation. A lot of code that we write is actually pretty repetitive and I really miss my preprocessor from the good old C days. Of course, today, it’s called Model Driven Development and we use XML and model transformation and EMF and the like but still.

Peter showed how to build a small DSL with Eclipse Xtext and generate code with the help of Xpand.

Kids, when you play with DSLs, always remember:

  1. They should be limited. Don’t build general-purpose programming languages with it. Less is more (less time spent debugging and hair pulling in this case).
  2. Know what you want to achieve. The tools won’t help you there.
  3. Know your tools. You can write Towers of Hanoi in SQL but it’s not as much fun as using JavaFX instead.

After the talk, I had a long chat with Peter about DSL debuggers. To make them work, we must have (at least) the following information:

  • Position in the input stream
  • Which DSL rule was applied
  • Which template contributed code
  • The state of the session at this time (values of all parameters, etc)
  • All user supplied transformations which were applied
  • Position in the output stream
    1. Only this huge amount of data will allow us to create meaningful “stack traces” if we want to debug DSL modeling problems.

      Spring ROO – A New Level of Enterprise Java Productivity by Eberhard Wolff

      I skipped most of the talk because I juggled ideas with Peter about DSL debuggers.

      Most of my problems are still there and will be solved by Roo 1.1 (couldn’t find out a release date for that).

      My major objection with Roo: It actually generates all the code. With Grails, for example, I get a controller but the class is empty. This makes it obvious where the defaults are being used. Roo, OTOH, copies a whole slew of code and files into your project when you create a new controller. This is code that you don’t know but which you’ll have to maintain.

      High Performance File IO: the Perl/Java battle by Daniel Eichhorn and Stefan Rufer

      How well does Java fare against Perl when it comes to filtering files if you use NIO? It seems that for big files, say 500MB, Java is just 25% slower which amounts to 24s vs 19s. 24 seconds to process a 500MB file twice isn’t that bad, is it?

      Mifos – the Grameen Foundation’s Java-based Microfinance application by Michael Vorburger

      Motto: Making the world better one line of code at a time. If you heard about microfinance, this is a software which helps to run it. Next time you find yourself with some time at your hands, how about helping fight poverty and join the Mifos open source project?

      Software in the service of handicapped people: Research & Development at Otto Bock by Hans-Willem van Vliet

      Along the same lines as Mifos, Otto Bock tries to make the world better by helping disabled people with wheelchairs and prostheses.

      It was interesting to hear how complex something like a smart leg is and how much people still want to look like everyone else.

      And That’s a Wrap

      With that, Jazoon 2010 ended. For me, it wasn’t as exciting as the last three years, mainly because the keynotes were somewhat weak. Well, see you all back in 2011.


Jazoon 2010, day 2

7. June, 2010

This is my report of day 2 (see my posts about day 1).

Total Cost of Ownership by Ken Schwaber

This talk was basically about Scrum and the fact that you can’t get something of value for free. Or to put it another way around: If you save some time today by quickly hacking up a feature, you’re gonna pay in the future. There is even an interest on this, so the later you have to pay, the more expensive it will get.

So the next time your boss asks you to do something “quick”, ask him whether (s)he is aware of the total cost and whether (s)he is really willing to pay it.

Unleash your processor(s) by Václav Pech

We all know that CPU’s don’t get faster, they just reproduce faster. PCs sold today have 4 cores (and each core can execute two threads at the same time). In 2012, intel is planning to release a 50 core chip and that’s just peanuts to what you can find on your graphics card (which can have roughly 600 very simple CPUs on a single chip).

The main problem here is that we, as humans, are extremely good at parallel processing at the hardware level (most of our body continues to works while we talk, think, eat, etc.) but we’re extremely bad when thinking about parallel problems.

Concepts from the HPC world and mainframes come to the rescue: Actors, Fork/Join, Parallel Arrays, Agents and Dataflow.

The idea is to get away from the tedious synchronization and use data structures which are already thread-safe and then write simple algorithms which are invoked by a framework on an as-needed basis. Imagine you have a huge amount of images to scale to thumbnails. The algorithm is always the same and it works independent of the input. So you can allocate a number of generic worker threads. Each of them gets a copy of the algorithm at runtime plus the arguments (image and thumbnail file name).

Then you have an algorithm to traverse the directory tree which produces the input and output file names. Instead of doing everything yourself, you take a parallel array and add file names as your tree workers discover them. This will trigger the thumbnail workers.

The interesting thing here: No synchronization. You don’t even write the threads. All you do is a single call:

inParallel (filenames, thumbnailer);

The thumbnailer is just as simple:

public class Thumbnailer extends Actor {
    public void act (Object item) {
        File input = ((File[])item)[0];
        File output = ((File[])item)[0];
        ... insert favorite scaler here ...
    }
}

See? No synchronized, volatile or extends Thread. Can’t wait? Check out JSR-166y

JavaFX: Designer developer workflow by Martin Gunnarsson and Pär Sikö

Tough one since I couldn’t decide where to go. HTML 5 with WebSockets? Maven 3.0?

Mouth-wetting talk about what you could do with software if everyone was just a little bit more open. In the talk, they showed how you could draw something in Photoshop and then export the design and use it directly in JavaFX.

It also showed some of the new features of JavaFX 1.3 which seems to follow the historical model of Java: 1.2 is the first version which is really usable. But it’s nice to see some progress in the Java world at last. I just wished we’d have got these five years ago when it would have mattered 🙂

Lunch break. 🙂

JavaFX – The condemned live longer by Andreas Fürer, David Sauter and Daniel Seiler

Along the same lines as the previous talk but this time, it shows some of the dark sides of JavaFX. Mostly boils down to: If you want to do fancy graphics in JavaFX, just do it. If you want to use it for more traditional UIs , then think again. Everything but the most simple components are still missing and those which exist sometimes have ugly bugs. 😦

My conclusion: Immature, oversold technology (or in managese: Sun’s bold response to the threads imposed by RCP and Flex/AIR).

Patterns and Practices in Hibernate by Patrycja Wegrzynowicz

Hibernate might be the most successful OR mapper for Java but it’s not the most simple (which is partly because of the documentation and that the problem itself isn’t very simple). I own the standard book about Hibernate, too, and I can agree that it explains in detail all the great features of Hibernate but it doesn’t answer “Why would I use that?”

Patrycja did a code review of the examples in the book and came up with lots of small problems and a couple of major ones (like code which doesn’t lock the rows in the correct order leading to an illegal state in the database). I talked to her and she wants to put the results of her code review online. This would mean we’d get a project with correct examples for using Hibernate.

She also mentioned SOLID which is an acronym made up from acronyms and stands for:

S – SRP (Single responsibility principle),
O – OCP (Open/closed principle),
L – LSP (Liskov substitution principle),
I – ISP (Interface segregation principle),
D – DIP (Dependency inversion principle)

This blog also explains it very well.

Migration to JPA – real life experience by Jan Sliwa

It’s always interesting when marketing hits the real world and all those buzz words are stripped to the bones. Jan talked about how to build a Java application which connects data centers all over Europe which contain sensitive data (medical records). To make the data secure, they applied a simple solution: The personal data is stored on the computers of the responsible doctor and only the medical files are saved on the servers. This means that the medical data itself is anonymous.

Two of the problems they encountered were:

  1. Creating an EntityManagerFactory is expensive. When do I open/close one? Is one enough for the whole application? Do I need a pool?
  2. How do I know whether an object is detached from the session?

He also talked about problems during testing. Maybe he should read my blog more often 🙂

Managed JPA in an OSGi framework – getting the best of both worlds by Tim Ward

OSGi is a framework for the paranoid. By default, it hides everything. So how do you expose your model to both the JPA framework and all the other places where it is used?

Tim explains the problems they encountered and how they solved them. My conclusion: For your problem, OSGi is not the solution. Spring and similar frameworks have shown how to do DI properly and Maven has shown how to handle dependencies. OSGi more and more feels like a remnant from the cold war where no one trusted anyone.

That’s for all for day 2. Next: day 3.


Jazoon 2010, day 1, part 2

7. June, 2010

Here is the rest of day 1 (cont’d from previous post):

Construction Techniques for Domain Specific Languages by Neal Ford

I’ve seen this talk before. Maybe in 2008?

Slides aren’t on Neal’s homepage nor on his github.

Do you really get class loaders? by Jevgeni Kabanov

Nice talk with lots of exceptions you’ve never seen before. It’s a good, real-world example how something simple (like class loading which is basically just loading streams of bytes from a list of places) can turn into a nightmare if you just add one single, innocent rule (like the web guys did back then with JSP 1.0 when they decided to reverse the order of lookups).

97 Things Every Programmer Should Know by Kevlin Henney

Kevlin has been busy with a new book: 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know (link goes to a page with the ToC which links to the content which is CC’d).

Some examples:

Best of all: Many of these rules date back to the 1960’s! Time to apply some of these rules 🙂

That was day 1. On to day 2!


Jazoon 2010 Day 1

2. June, 2010

So, this is the great wrap-up of Jazoon 2010, day 1. What did I have?

The keynote by Danny Coward

Java SE and JavaFX: The Road Ahead. After the acquisition by Oracle, everyone was curious as to what happens to Java. Unfortunately, the slides aren’t online, yet but from my faint memory, we might get closures after all and with a sane syntax, too. Plus all the stuff mentioned on Sun’s JDK 7 page. ATM, this stuff is a bit fluent and it’s hard to get a definitive list but something is moving at least.

From my point of view, closures and all the other language features are too late for the Java language (important companies won’t upgrade to Java 7 and time soon, some of them even cling to 1.4!) but the implementation in the main language of the Java VM will allow to build better and faster non-Java languages on top of the VM. Now if the VM would include a compiler API to build JNI code for native libraries on the fly, we would have a worthy challenger for .NET. Yeah … I know. A man can have dreams, okay?

And there was some talk about JavaFX. It seems that the technology is starting to reach its beta-phase, soon (see my notes for the second day). He showed one demo: Geo View of Vancouver 2010. It’s a world map with which country won how many medals and when you open one of the blobs, you get the names of the athletes in a fan-out widget. You can click on the name to get more information (like the photo) or you can compare the results against countries with the same number of athletes or population or closest GDP or just closest geographically. It gives a nice example how to visualize a lot of data and wade through them intuitively.

Client / Server 2.0 with Java and Flex by James Ward

James showed how you can use Flash and a Java server to build really nice web apps. He showed several examples: A few lines of code to build a UI which runs on an Android mobile phone, in the web browser and on the desktop. All with really nice performance. One was the insurance company demo. Just enter some arbitrary data until you come to the damage details and incident report. They show new ways to enter information which make the tool usable to anyone who can recognize a car and a top-view of a street.

If you like what you see, you should probably take the Tour de Flex. It shows off a whole lot of stuff. Also try the Tour de Flex Dashboard. It shows you in real time who looks at what part of the TdF right now.

Blueprint – Modern Dependency Injection for OSGi by Costin Leau

Another DI system, this time tied to OSGi. Nothing really exciting here. The talk was okay but the speaker soon lost my interest.

One thing to note: Eclipse 4 comes with a different DI system. I wonder if they will drop that in favor of the new OSGi standard in 4.1.

Patterns and Best Practices for building large GWT applications by Heiko Braun

I went to see this but quickly realized that I’ve heard the talk before at the JUGS. Here is the link to the slides. As a result of his experience he started project errai which collects best practices to build large GWT applications.

Objects of Value by Kevlin Henney

One of the main weak points on software development is that we don’t know what we’re talking about. When my project manager comes to me and asks “When are you done?” my answer is “Soon” … Right 😉 Or think about strings. Everyone else on the planet calls it “text”.

Obviously, Kevlin had a lot of fun on stage and so had we. In essence, “Objects of Value” or “Value Objects” are even more simple than POJOs (think Integer class). The main reason to use them is to make your code more expressive and readable. Instead of

public User (String name, String firstName, int age, String zipCode, String city)

you (can) create a couple of value objects:

public User (Name name, FirstName firstName, Age age, ZipCode zipCode, City city)

This may sound ridiculous (and it is in this example) but in a lot of places, using String is just a form of bad laziness (the kind of laziness which leads to maintenance problems later). One of the advantages of the approach above is that you notice when you mix last and first name because the compiler will tell you. The major disadvantage is that it leads to a class explosion. Not to an instance explosion since we just replace a String value object with something that tells us what we have, though.

In addition to that, Java isn’t really meant for these kinds of objects. There is a lot of boiler plate code to define value objects and to use them. But if you have a system that is sufficiently complex and you use a value with a unit in many places (think of a currency value), you should really consider to replace the String+BigDecimal combination with a value object.

Many important points of his talk can be found in the paper Objects of Value on his homepage.

This concludes the first part of my Jazoon 2010 report. Go on with part 2.